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Editors-in-Chief
    J. S. Chen
    Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering
    Univ. of California, Los Angeles, U.S.A.
    Y.B. Yang
    Dept. of Civil Engineering
    National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan
    C. S. David Chen
    Dept. of Civil Engineering,
    National Taiwan Univ., Taiwan
Managing Editor
    C. K. Choi, Ph.D
    Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering
    Korea Advanced Inst. of Science & Tech., Korea

ISSN: 1976-0426(Print), ISSN: 2092-6200(Online)
Vol 7(4 issues) for 2014, Quarterly
Aims and Scopes
The themes of IMMIJ cover a wide range of subjects associated with interaction and/or multiscale mechanics encountered in engineering and scientific research and practice. Typical subjects considered by the journal include:
Analytical, computational, and experimental multiscale and interaction mechanics
Fluid-structure interactions
Soil-structure interactions
Vehicle-bridge interactions
Floating and ocean structures
Computational materials science and engineering
MEMS and NEMS
Multi-physics and multi-disciplinary problems
Multiscale biomechanics
Other related topics
The aim of Interaction and Multiscale Mechanics: an International Journal (IMMIJ) is to provide a platform for publication of research results in which interaction and multiscale mechanics plays a vital role. This journal publishes articles with contributions in all aspects of interaction and/or multiscale problems. The problems of interaction mechanics include the interaction of two different subjects/systems, whether they are connected or not, with or without relative motion. The problems of multiscale mechanics include structural, mechanical or material systems with varying length or time scales. As many contemporary and innovative designs encompass interaction phenomena and multiscale features, papers featuring advancement of theories and applications of interaction and/or multiscale mechanics are particularly encouraged for the journal.
Editorial Board
Narayan R. Aluru
Dept. of Mechanical Sci. and Eng.
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
U.S.A

Zdenek P. Bazant
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Eng.
Northwestern Univ.
U.S.A.

Ted Belytschko
Dept. of Theoretical & Applied Mechanics
Northwestern Univ.
U.S.A.

Rene de Borst
Dept. Civil Eng. and Mechanics
University of Glasgow
U.K.

Mark A. Bradford
Sch. of Civil and Environmental Eng.
Univ. of New South Wales
Australia

Achi Brandt
Dept. of Applied Mathematics &
Computer Sci., The Weizmann Inst. of Sci.
Israel

Maenghyo Cho
Sch. of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng.
Seoul National University
Korea

Chang-Koon Choi
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Eng.
Korea Advanced Inst. of Sci. and Tech.
Korea

Jun-Zhi Cui
Inst. of Computational Mathematics and Sci.
/Eng. Computing, Chinese Academy of Sci.
China

Nasr M. Ghoniem
Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng.
Univ. of California, Los Angeles
U.S.A.

Somnath Ghosh
Dept. of Mechanical Eng.
Ohio State Univ., Ohio
U.S.A.

Michael Griebel
Inst. for Numerical Simulation and
Inst. for Applied Mathematics
Univ. of Bonn, Germany

Thomas Hou
Dept. of Applied Mathematics
California Inst. of Tech.
U.S.A.

Yonggang Huang
Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Eng.
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
U.S.A.

Antonio Huerta
Dept. of Applied Mathematics
Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya
Spain

Thomas J. R. Hughes
Inst. for Computational Eng. and Sci.
Univ. of Texas-Austin
U.S.A.

Sergio R. Idelsohn
Asociacion Argentina de Mecanica
Computacional
Argentina

Anthony R. Ingraffea
School of Civil and Environmental Eng.
Cornell Univ.
U.S.A.

Bassam A Izzuddin
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Eng.
Imperial College
U.K.

Liang-Jenq Leu
Dept. of Civil Eng.
National Taiwan Univ.
Taiwan

Kim Meow Liew
Dept. of Building and Construction
City Univ. of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Wing Kam Liu
Dept. of Mechanical Eng.
Northwestern Univ.
U.S.A.

Chien-Ching Ma
Dept. of Mechanical Eng.
National Taiwan Univ.
Taiwan

Herbert Mang
Inst. for Mech. of Materials & Structures
Vienna Univ. of Technology
Austria

Yi-Lung Mo
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Eng.
Univ. of Houston
U.S.A.

Subrata Mukherjee
Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
Cornell Univ.
U.S.A.

J. Tinsley Oden
Dept. of Aerospace Eng. and Eng. Mechanics
Univ. of Texas-Austin
U.S.A.

Eugenio Onate
IntĄŻl Center for
Numerical Methods in Eng.(CIMNE)
Technical Univ. of Catalonia, Spain

Stanley Osher
Dept. of Mathematics
Univ. of California
Los Angeles, U.S.A.

Glaucio H. Paulino
Dept. of Civil and Environmental Eng.
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
U.S.A.

J. N. Reddy
Dept. of Mechanical Eng.
Texas A&M Univ.
U.S.A.

Fernando A. Rochinha
Mechanical Eng. Department
Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro
Brazil

Eric Savin
Structural Dynamics & Coupled Systems Dept.
Office Nat'l dĄŻEtudes et de
Recherches Aerospatiales, France

Bernhard A. Schrefler
Dipartimento Di Costruzioni e Trasporti
Universita degli Studi di Padova
Italy

Izuru Takewaki
Dept. of Urban and Environmental Eng.
Kyoto Univ., Kyoto
Japan

Dongdong Wang
Department of Civil Engineering
Xiamen University
China

Cheng-Tang Wu
Livermore Software Technology Corporation
USA

Genki Yagawa
Dept. of Quantum Eng. and System Sci.
Univ. of Tokyo
Japan

Tongxi Yu
Dept. of Mechanical Eng.
Hong Kong Univ. of Sci. and Tech.
Hong Kong

Mingwu Yuan
Dept. of Mechanics & Eng. Sci.
Peking Univ.
China

Wanxie Zhong
Research Inst. of Eng. Mechanics
Dalian Univ. of Tech.
China






Instructions to Authors

1. Submission of the paper
Authors are asked to submit manuscripts in PDF format electronically through the Techno-Press Manuscript Upload System (TeMUS) (http://www.techno-press.org/papers). Exceptionally, the special issue papers may be directly submitted to the Guest Editor. If you have difficulties in using TeMUS, please contact us at[technop@chol.com]. On receiving submitted papers, the system will issue the paper ID and Password to the corresponding author which may be conveniently used to check the status of submitted papers.
2. Preparation of the manuscript
General : The manuscripts should be in English and typed with single column and single line spacing on single side of A4 paper. Submitted papers will be published in three categories, i.e., 1) Regular technical paper, 2) Review papers and 3) Discussions. The first page of an article should contain; (1) a title of paper which well reflects the contents of the paper (Arial, 16pt), (2) all the name(s) and affiliations(s) of authors(s) (Arial, 12pt), (3) an abstract of 100~250 words (Times New Roman, 11pt), (4) 5-10 keywords following the abstract, and (5) footnote (personal title and email address of the corresponding author (required) and other authors' (not mandatory)). The paper should be concluded by proper conclusions which reflect the findings in the paper. The normal length of the technical paper should be about 14-20 journal pages. There will be no page charges and no other fees unless the author wishes arrangements to provide an open access to his article. Authors are advised to read the details in the Appendix A for guide and Appendix B for a template of the instructions to authors for the format of the first page of the paper.
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References : A list of references which reflect the current state of technology in the field locates after conclusions of the paper. For details to prepare the list of references and cite them in the text, authors are advised to follow the introduction and the sample list in the Appendix A of the instruction.
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*Appendix A. Authors' Guide
*Appendix B. Template
*Appendix C. Index
Sample issue
Volume 5, Number 1, March 2012

Abstract
Considerable longitudinal rail forces and displacements may develop in continuous welded rail (CWR) track on long-span bridges due to temperature variations. The track stability may be disturbed due to excessive relative displacements between the sleepers and ballast bed and the accompanied reduction in frictional resistance. For high-speed tracks, however, solving these problems by installing rail expansion devices in the track is not an attractive solution as these devices may cause a local disturbance of the vertical track stiffness and track geometry which will require intensive maintenance. With reference to temperature, two actions are considered by the bridge loading standards, the uniform variation in the rail and deck temperature and the temperature gradient in deck. Generally, the effect of temperature gradient has been disregarded in the interaction analysis. This paper mainly deals with the effect of temperature gradient on the track-bridge interaction with respect to the support reaction, rail stresses and stability. The study presented in this paper was not mentioned in the related codes so far.

Key Words
Temperature gradient; track-bridge interaction; continuous welded rail; buckling factor; numerical modeling.

Address
Rakesh Kumar and Akhil Upadhyay: Department of Civil Engineering, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee-247667, India

  • Wave propagation in a generalized thermo elastic plate embedded in elastic medium
    P. Ponnusamy and R. Selvamani
    Abstract; Full Text (852K)

Abstract
In this paper, the wave propagation in a generalized thermo elastic plate embedded in an elastic medium (Winkler model) is studied based on the Lord-Schulman (LS) and Green-Lindsay (GL) generalized two dimensional theory of thermo elasticity. Two displacement potential functions are introduced to uncouple the equations of motion. The frequency equations that include the interaction between the plate and foundation are obtained by the traction free boundary conditions using the Bessel function solutions. The numerical calculations are carried out for the material Zinc and the computed nondimensional frequency and attenuation coefficient are plotted as the dispersion curves for the plate with thermally insulated and isothermal boundaries. The wave characteristics are found to be more stable and realistic in the presence of thermal relaxation times and the foundation parameter. A comparison of the results for the case with no thermal effects shows well agreement with those by the membrane theory.

Key Words
wave propagation; vibration of thermal plate; plate immersed in fluid; generalized thermo elastic plate; Winkler foundation.

Address
P. Ponnusamy: Department of Mathematics, Government Arts College (Autonomous), Coimbatore, TamilNadu, India. R. Selvamani: Department of Mathematics, Karunya University, Coimbatore, TamilNadu, India.

  • Multiscale method and pseudospectral simulations for linear viscoelastic incompressible flows
    Ling Zhang and Jie Ouyang
    Abstract; Full Text (4391K)

Abstract
The two-dimensional incompressible flow of a linear viscoelastic fluid we considered in this research has rapidly oscillating initial conditions which contain both the large scale and small scale information. In order to grasp this double-scale phenomenon of the complex flow, a multiscale analysis method is developed based on the mathematical homogenization theory. For the incompressible flow of a linear viscoelastic Maxwell fluid, a well-posed multiscale system, including averaged equations and cell problems, is derived by employing the appropriate multiple scale asymptotic expansions to approximate the velocity, pressure and stress fields. And then, this multiscale system is solved numerically using the pseudospectral algorithm based on a time-splitting semi-implicit influence matrix method. The comparisons between the multiscale solutions and the direct numerical simulations demonstrate that the multiscale model not only captures large scale features accurately, but also reflects kinetic interactions between the large and small scale of the incompressible flow of a linear viscoelastic fluid.

Key Words
linear viscoelastic fluid; incompressible flow; multiscale analysis; averaged equations; cell problems; pseudospectral algorithm.

Address
Ling Zhang and Jie Ouyang: Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi

  • Deterioration of tensile behavior of concrete exposed to artificial acid rain environment
    Y.F. Fan, Z.Q. Hu and H.Y. Luan
    Abstract; Full Text (13789K)

Abstract
This study is focused on evaluation of the tensile properties of concrete exposed to acid rain environment. Acid rain environment was simulated by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid in the laboratory. The dumbell-shaped concrete specimens were submerged in pure water and acid solution for accelerated conditioning. Weighing, tensile test, CT, SEM/EDS test and microanalysis were performed on the specimens. Tensile characteristics of the damaged concrete are obtained quantitatively. Evolution characteristics of the voids, micro cracks, chemical compounds, elemental distribution and contents in the concrete are examined. The deterioration mechanisms of concrete exposed to acid rain are well elucidated.

Key Words
concrete; multiscale; SEM; atmospheric corrosion.

Address
Y.F. Fan and H.Y. Luan: Institute of Road and Bridge Engineering, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, China Z.Q. Hu: Institute of Civil and Hydraulic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, China

  • Non-linear analysis of pile groups subjected to lateral loads using
    H.S. Chore, R.K. Ingle and V.A. Sawant
    Abstract; Full Text (1717K)

Abstract
The paper presents the analysis of two groups of piles subjected to lateral loads incorporating the non-linear behaviour of soil. The finite element method is adopted for carrying out the parametric study of the pile groups. The pile is idealized as a one dimensional beam element, the pile cap as two dimensional plate elements and the soil as non-linear elastic springs using the p-y curves developed by Georgiadis et al. (1992). Two groups of piles, embedded in a cohesive soil, involving two and three piles in series and parallel arrangement thereof are considered. The response of the pile groups is found to be significantly affected by the parameters such as the spacing between the piles, the number of piles in a group and the orientation of the lateral load. The non-linear response of the system is, further, compared with the one by Chore et al. (2012) obtained by the analysis of a system to the present one, except that the soil is assumed to be linear elastic. From the comparison, it is observed that the non-linearity of soil is found to increase the top displacement of the pile group in the range of 66.4%-145.6%, while decreasing the fixed moments in the range of 2% to 20% and the positive moments in the range of 54% to 57%.

Key Words
laterally loaded piles; winkler

Address
H.S. Chore: Department of Civil Engineering, Datta Meghe College of Engineering, Sector-3, Airoli, Navi Mumbai- 400 708, India R.K. Ingle: Department of Applied Mechanics, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), Nagpur- 440 010, India V.A. Sawant: Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Roorkee–247 667, India

  • Coupled foot-shoe-ground interaction model to assess landing impact transfer characteristics to ground condition
    S.H. Kim, J.R. Cho, J.H. Choi, S.H. Ryu and W.B. Jeong
    Abstract; Full Text (4955K)

Abstract
This paper investigates the effects of sports ground materials on the transfer characteristics of the landing impact force using a coupled foot-shoe-ground interaction model. The impact force resulting from the collision between the sports shoe and the ground is partially dissipated, but the remaining portion transfers to the human body via the lower extremity. However, since the landing impact force is strongly influenced by the sports ground material we consider four different sports grounds, asphalt, urethane, clay and wood. We use a fully coupled 3-D foot-shoe-ground interaction model and we construct the multi-layered composite ground models. Through the numerical simulation, the landing impact characteristics such as the ground reaction force (GRF), the acceleration transfer and the frequency response characteristics are investigated for four different sports grounds. It was found that the risk of injury, associated with the landing impact, was reduced as the ground material changes from asphalt to wood, from the fact that both the peak vertical acceleration and the central frequency monotonically decrease from asphalt to wood. As well, it was found that most of the impact acceleration and frequency was dissipated at the heel, then not much changed from the ankle to the knee.

Key Words
coupled foot-shoe-ground interaction model; landing impact force; ground condition; ground reaction force; acceleration transfer; frequency response.

Address
S.H. Kim, J.H. Choi, S.H. Ryu and W.B. Jeong: School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735, Korea J.R. Cho: School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735, Korea; Research & Development Institute of Midas IT., Gyeonggi 463-400, Korea

Table of Contents
       
 
  • 2014  Volume 7      No. 1  
     
  • 2013  Volume 6      No. 1      No.2    No.3    No.4
     
  • 2012  Volume 5      No. 1      No.2    No.3    No.4
     
  • 2011  Volume 4      No. 1      No.2    No.3    No.4
     
  • 2010  Volume 3      No. 1      No.2    No.3    No.4
     
  • 2009  Volume 2      No. 1      No.2    No.3    No.4
     
  • 2008  Volume 1      No. 1      No.2    No.3    No.4
           
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